Thursday, June 26, 2014

A Walk Through The Park


I thought I would dust off this blog and give everyone a treat today. Why? Because about a month ago, I received a b'day present of a slightly used digital video camera. A camera that is 1000 times better than the cheapy Colby camera that I had used for the past few years.

Anyways, today's pictorial will feature pics taken on a picnic I took with the wife on June 20th at Mill Pond Park. Enjoy!

 1) This is similar to one that I took a couple of years ago, in which I was laying on my back and looking up. Strangely enough, my wife did ask what I was doing, and strangely enough, I answered.

2} A very distant shot of ducks, even though I used the zoom feature on the camera. As you can see by the algae, it's been wickedly hot and dry this year so far.

3} With this shot, I was able to get much closer to the pond (a bench for people to watch and..ahem...feed the geese from was nearby) and thus make better use of the zoom feature.

4} Another shot of the geese from the same area.

5} This was taken from the bridge that crosses the waterfall, which was bone dry this particular day. My wife thinks that one of the ducks in this pic used to visit our little pond back in the day before the dogs chased them out.

6} Another duck sunbathing on the rocks. The sad part is that you can usually see these rocks when there has been a distinct lack of rain in the area for an extended period of time.

7} Still more ducks. Ducks at the pond are just about the easiest animals to take pictures of.

8} Yup, you guessed it, more ducks. We have a large population of two types of feathered friends: ducks and Canadian geese.

9} And still yet more ducks taking their hourly bath at the edge of the waterfall.

10} This was taken with a zoom as I wanted to get a shot of the duck swimming inside the water fountain.

11} The water fountain, which was donated by the Newington Garden Club back in the late 70's. There are two of them, one at the northern and the other at the southern end of the pond. They only come out for play when there's been a distinct lack of rain in the area for an extended period of time, thus giving Mother Nature a helping hand in maintaining the minimum water levels.